Tuesday, April 24, 2012

The End Of The Prison-Industrial Complex In CA?


SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Aided by a rapid decline in the state's inmate population, California prison officials are proposing a dramatic change in the way they do business and moving to take control of the system back from the federal courts.

In a plan announced Monday to close one prison, revamp others and scrap most of a $6 billion prison construction plan, officials say they will save the state billions of dollars in coming years.

"It's a massive change," Matthew Cate, secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said at a Capitol news conference.

Among the proposals:

- Close the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco, where about 1,200 correctional employees work and 3,900 inmates are housed.

- End contracts with out-of-state prisons and return 9,500 inmates to California by 2016.

- Eliminate about 6,400 positions.

- Halt most of a prison expansion program, saving $4.1 billion in building costs.

The goal is to improve conditions inside California's prison system so that, by the end of 2013, the state may no longer be under the oversight of federal courts that have ordered improvements in medical, mental health and dental care.


Aided by a rapid decline in the state's inmate population, California prison officials are proposing a dramatic change in the way they do business and moving to take control of the system back from the federal courts.
In a plan announced Monday to close one prison, revamp others and scrap most of a $6 billion prison construction plan, officials say they will save the state billions of dollars in coming years.
"It's a massive change," Matthew Cate, secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said at a Capitol news conference.
Among the proposals:
- Close the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco, where about 1,200 correctional employees work and 3,900 inmates are housed.
- End contracts with out-of-state prisons and return 9,500 inmates to California by 2016.
- Eliminate about 6,400 positions.
- Halt most of a prison expansion program, saving $4.1 billion in building costs.
The goal is to improve conditions inside California's prison system so that, by the end of 2013, the state may no longer be under the oversight of federal courts that have ordered improvements in medical, mental health and dental care.
SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Aided by a rapid decline in the state's inmate population, California prison officials are proposing a dramatic change in the way they do business and moving to take control of the system back from the federal courts.

In a plan announced Monday to close one prison, revamp others and scrap most of a $6 billion prison construction plan, officials say they will save the state billions of dollars in coming years.

"It's a massive change," Matthew Cate, secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said at a Capitol news conference.

Among the proposals:

- Close the California Rehabilitation Center in Norco, where about 1,200 correctional employees work and 3,900 inmates are housed.

- End contracts with out-of-state prisons and return 9,500 inmates to California by 2016.

- Eliminate about 6,400 positions.

- Halt most of a prison expansion program, saving $4.1 billion in building costs.

The goal is to improve conditions inside California's prison system so that, by the end of 2013, the state may no longer be under the oversight of federal courts that have ordered improvements in medical, mental health and dental care.





Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/04/23/146481/california-prison-officials-move.html#storylink=cpy


Post a Comment